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the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to live in the country? so what we have seen now in the global phenomena is everywhere from sweden to america and canada to i ran to singapore is people choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in human history that this is happen voluntarily on a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: well how do we know that fertility is -- that is how is it measured and are we t
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. countering violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not h
on tolerance, justice and where no discrimination based on religion, gender or ethnicity can be accepted. so, president, i'm very pleased to see that your government is defending marriage for all. [applause] >> translator: that is also our stance on the issue. change is afoot in france, president, but also in europe. we need to continue in order to create a fairer social europe, one that shows solidarity and one which is stronger on the global stage. your role is crucial, president. do not give in to the vision of a single market that mr. cameron sees. that's not our vision of europe. quite the contrary, in fact. you need to say to mrs. merkel, mr. president: angela, eisenhower, brant, schmidt, cole, all of these men had a vision of europe. help me to achieve our vision of europe. you've said that you would recreate the french vision when you were elected, and now in the council you can help breathe life back into the european vision. thank you. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: thank you very much, indeed. now on behalf of the united liberals and -- [inaudible] displt th
that if they iewnd how god works they would know that. they are horrible at religion. >> i love that. if these stupid, grieving people would get it through their heads, he is a disgusting person. and i love the concept that god wouldn't kill people. there are seven stories that completely contridict that. i am pretty sure there has been a lot of killing throughout the years. innocent or guilty he is a more ron. >> that's a bold statement. >> he is a great man. >> why and he a great man? i am curious why you think that? >> because although i don't think he is guilty and he has denied it and there are a lot of people there and it doesn't make sense and that wasn't who the police were trying to get, by the way. they wanted him to testify against the other two so they didn't think he was guilty anyway. in any event he was hanging out with bad people and he had a bad life and he completely turned his life around and became this incredibly good person who gave so much to the man who died when he did not kill. >> that was called a settlement. >> apparently he was quite generous. he didn't fight it. he has a
and it looks like the lone star state might have some. religion may have clients who say we are frightened here in new york? >> we deal with a very unique client base. they have a fixed budget, certain amount of income in an annual basis. it is pa how to handle those dollars. the question is, is that the wisest use of my money? nine times out of 10, where do you move to? texas, nevada, florida. liz: governor jerry brown is saying i don't like what governor perry is doing, using some tricks here. he has it all wrong. california, we have great weather, venture capital, an educated workforce. don't go to texas, come to california. >> they also have a state income tax, highest in the country, they have a corporate income tax, the highest gas taxes in the country, our clients are going desert looking to move. california is a great place and if you can afford to be there, it is a wonderful place to live but that is becoming less and less true for the average citizen. they need to find a lower-cost place to go and unfortunately texas ranks as number one business state in the country year after year. l
are -- >> always a civil rights guy. i'm still a civil rights guy going way, way back. to me religion freedom is different. it is just different. if you have a religious conscience you should be able to abide by it. the government should not be able to tell you otherwise. this is just a health care mandate. >> the government is not telling what you to do. >> they've created a right to employer provided contraception. you've created in the constitution, in the penumbra a new right to -- exactly. >> you've created that in your definition, your interpretation of it. but clearly what the obama administration is trying to do is to figure out a way to thread the needle here, to provide coverage for people and at the same time deal with the concerns of the religious organizations. the fact they continue to make compromises is an indication that they're trying to be flexible. >> well, not alienating its female base, which it tried to get all ginned up, isn't that basically what it is? the whole element of the democratic party, far left, hollywood, that just doesn't get the religious objection. they t
, tribe, religion, region, whatever, your industry these days. politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics and policy will stand for something bigger, something broader. like the public interest, freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of the independence and the pledge of allegiance. we hope in washington that's what think tanks do. think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interests benefits from public policy. obviously, there are some who do that better than others. in the ideal of the think tank is committed to the public interest, even though we may disagree what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have a world view a perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm in favor of that. but to define if something is working you have to define what the goals you seek to achieve. is freedom one of the goals that policy ought to enhance? is justice? is social progress? widespread prosperi
. the state has become the major religion in this country. the icons in washington -- they have to destroy every aspect of people who hold to a higher moral authority. host: the headline in this morning "the wall street journal" -- castle in michigan, on our lands for democrats. -- ethel in michigan, on our line for democrats. caller: my question is, what happened between the separation between church and state? i believe this is more of a legal issue than a religious issue. the religious issue is for the contraceptive. i can understand that. why is this being mixed in with state issues? he did not have to take them if you do not want them, if you do not believe in them. don't use them. i just cannot understand why this does not go away. i am really quite tired of it all. thank you. host: more from the article in this morning's "the wall street journal." they write -- the new rules would require insurers to pay the up-front cost. our next call comes from carol in ohio, on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. i am totally against what the catholic church and republicans are doing a
together who did not usually come together. we were not bounded in a common race or religion. we are not a theocracy. we are not a minority. this nation was born with the ideals that a united people, but these ideals compel every generation to be more inclusive and welcoming. we realize this country was not a zero some political nation. in fact, the more we open up this country to inclusion, the better we are. women joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i be
religions. unquote. the mission statement i just quoted translates into a comprehensive effort to penetrate to influence, otherwise subvert our american civil society. a form of government, a governing institutions. that explanatory memorandum i just quoted from was written on may 19, 1991, by a top muslim brotherhood operative, -- operative. now, though the justice department has established in federal court during the holy land foundation trials in dallas texas, that the groups identified by the muslim brotherhood in their memo are, quote, their organizations, end quote, a number of them and their successors have been treated by the obama administration as key interlock tors -- interlocutories in dealing with jihad. and believes in this administration, believe that these muslim brotherhood front organizations are legitimate representatives of the muslim -american community. they have enabled the muslim brotherhood to recruit and to show others, look, we are the ones that the white house trusts. we could call the white house. we can call and tell them we have -- there are three people who
, they would learn about each other's religion. at the boxing match, just before the bell rang, one of the boxes made the sign of the cross. the rabbi nudged the priest and asked what that meant. the priest says, it does not mean a thing if he cannot fight. [laughter] we bless ourselves with the hope that everything will be ok in this country. it does not mean a damn thing unless you are willing to fight for it. my message to you is that it does not mean a damn thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream, a dream my parents had, a dream of giving our children a better life, a dream of always maintaining a government of, by, and for people. that course of duty is now passing to a new generation. with it passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for that better future. thank you very much. god bless you. god bless the united states of america. [applause] i will take a few questions. call ahead. >> thank you. thank you for coming to georgetown university and talking to us. i am in the security studies program here. i am taking a class on u.s. defense budgeting.
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
and religion. if davis is released, he would be the first member of manson's so-called family to be released on parole. >>> fbi agents searching in a san joaquin county well for buried murder victims have not made any discoveries. authorities are searching for the victims of killer's wesley sherman tine and herman her sog. the well has reached a depth of 65 feet, but with no findings. sherman tine says the well is not one of his disposal spots. >>> new information this morning about the fatal shooting of a deputy in modesto. according to a new report, deputy bob paris was warned to be very cautious when serving an eviction notice on james ferraro. paris was reportedly told ferraro was likely armed and may have had bombs inside his modesto town house. paris and a locksmith were killed in april while trying to drill through a lock in the front door of the home. >>> should teachers carry guns on local campuses? a new survey shows california voters say no. 1200 voters were asked and 31% want teachers carrying guns at school. 67% favor hiring counselors over police officers. and 96% think emergen
other's religion. just before the bell rang, one of the boxers made the sign of the cross. the rabbi nudged the priest and said, what does that mean? the priest said it doesn't mean a darn thing if you can't fight. [laughter] we bless ourselves with the hope that everything will be okay in this country. but very frankly, it won't mean a thing unless you're willing to fight for it. so my message to you, to the students in this audience, but it doesn't mean a thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream. the dream that my parents had. the dream of giving our children a better life. the dream of maintaining a government for the people. that torch of duty is now passing to a new generation. with that passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for that better future. thank you, very much. god bless you. and god bless the united states of america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you. [applause] okay, i will take a few questions. >> thank you, thank you secretary panetta for talking to us. i am in the security studies program here at georgetown. i am taking
that we're the greatest country, because we're all different nationalities and all different religions and we should show the rest of the world how to behave. >> with reference to the nazis, what was that? >> well, he fought in the battle of the bulge. he's a war hero. so that's the reference. >> so the fact that he was obviously dramatically influenced by world war ii? >> exactly. >> and that's still part of your life right now. and that's what -- you see some connection with your experience -- >> well, violence has to be stopped. >> war is the lowest form of human behavior. killing is the worst form of -- you know, i just finished writing a book -- i'm not plugging it right now, but i wrote, life is a gift. we are blessed with being alive. we should enjoy it and enjoy our neighbors and help our cousins and relatives and friends, one another. we should all help one another. it's a gift. we have a gift with our lives. >> well, mr. bennett, danny, tony bennett, thank you both for coming in. if you won't sing, we're going to play some clips that we love to hear from you. >> i love this v
's religion. at the boxing match just before the bell rang one of the boxes made the sign of the cross. the priest said, it does not mean anything if you cannot fight. we bless ourselves with the hope everything will be ok in this country. it does not mean anything unless you're willing to fight for it. my message to you is that it does not mean a thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream. the drama -- that torch of duty is as into a new generation. with it passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for the better future. think you very much. god bless you. god bless the united states of america. [applause] i will take a few questions. call ahead. >> thank you. thank you for coming to georgetown university and talking to us. i am in the security studies program here. i am taking a class on u.s. defense budgeting. at georgetown, we do care about these issues and we share your concerns, as well. in the defense budget of 2013, i understand 19% of the budget is being represented for personnel. about 26% is for procurement. 40% is for operations. if you look at all
of their race, color, religion, or gender. vawa encourages collaboration among law enforcement, judicial personnel, public and private sector providers to victims of domestic and sexual violence. it also works to increase public awareness. madam president, one in four women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. an estimated 1.3 million women are victims of sexual assault by an intimate partner every year. there are more than 18,000 cases in maryland of domestic abuse and 38 fatalities. that period of time has been the lowest number of domestic violence-related deaths on record for the state, but these numbers are still very much unacceptable. i am disappointed last year the house refused to take up legislation that we approved. it also refused to go to conference to work out differences between the two bills. i urge my colleagues to pass the legislation that is pending here and urge my colleagues in the house to quickly take up the senate bill and enact it into law. with that, madam president, i would suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk should
and pop really got religion now? >> i think the answer to that is no. january is seasonally a very good month, as halls been with the year-end reinvestment and pension contributions, has been a very good month for mutual funds. it's better than it was in the summer and autumn and winter. just last year. and so it's not the big pop that one would think you'd get. i, for one, think that's good. you know, when mutual fund investors pile into equities, it's usually a very negative sign for the market. so something like the dow going 14,000, i can contain my enthusiasm about that. it doesn't mean very much. >> and a lot of people have pointed out some of the records that we broke this month -- or i should say january, sort of were a reminder of the last time we set those records, which not too happy days were soon to follow, jack. >> well, yeah, you're right about that. it's even more dramatic if you go beyond the dow which has its advantages, and great limits. you go to the nasdaq, and that index is around 4,700 at its high in 2000. and now it's -- you tell me, 3,200 maybe. it's still fully
for your race or your tribe or your religion or your ideology or your region, whatever, your industry, these days, policy, politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics, and especially policy, will stand for something bigger, something broader, like the public interest, like freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of independence and constitution and the pledge of allegiance. and ideally we hope in washington that that's what think tanks do, that think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interest benefits from public policy. and, obviously, there are some who do that better than others but in the platonic ideal of the think tank is one committed to the public interest and even though we may disagree about what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have an ideology, and worldview of perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm all in favor of analyzing things and seeing what works, but to d
need to drain the swamp. instead it radicalizes people standing up using religion as a mobilizing force. host: the ambassador made a comment yesterday at a breakfast hosted by the christian science monitor. we covered it. c-span.org to what spoken. the washington times said the ambassador said that the attacks violate pakistani sovereignty and international law. the reaction from the aclu has been besthis -- ronnie in orlando, florida, independent. caller: thank you very much. i think it is absolutely outrageous, but it is just a continuation of outrageous policy that have gone on for the last almost 12 years now. i have to say that the previous caller, it just breaks my heart , in thinking that people that are objecting to these policies are against president obama along racial lines. this is not a racial issue. this is not a democrat versus republican issue. this is an issue that we americans are losing our democracy. our constitution is being shredded. gue natione nat internationally. in order to turn this around, which we have got to do, we did not lose 3,000 the law 9/11 to an outs
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not have an up-to-date broadcast
are going to be the ones running this at the end. >> she is going to drug you what america's religion which is democracy and everyone in america loves democracy. on a grant that. i plead guilty to taking that. >> and i am right there with you but this is not about -- there is much more going on here to get anybody that knows the middle east knows that the borders were drawn around people that don't necessarily want to live together. we have seen this in israel, palestinians and jews do not want to live together. now, we could say let's have democracy and have a one state solution. joost not want a one-stop solution and palestinians do not want a one-stop solution. it's not about the democracy in palestine and israel and its about the democracy in iraq. we said was going to make democracy and cast the sunni is down. they were not. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, the government, the education system and that is what is going to have been anybody that thinks that when the takeover and syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions into the next stat
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
standing up against militants and terrorists, using our religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. i think that drones as an instrument may have had some efficacy in terms of decisions, but we cannot allow us f-16's to come in. we use our own to run our anti- terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. drones are really -- we do not see them as productive at all. >> what would you tell the staff? what do you tell a member of the general staff? i think we are all on the same page now. members of the general staff and ourselves, where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door, and in any case you know that al qaeda, the whole -- through our cooperation and joint efforts, is pretty much degraded. that is something this administration will agree to also. >> james madison -- as british troops invaded the capital, she is known for saving eight portrait of george
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)